Autism News Tagged "asperger syndrome"

The Positive Effects of Dogs on ASD: Ms. Claire’s Excellent Adventure

A Canine Assisted Educational Initiative

I think the ‘Claire Buron Project’, as we have come to call it, began years ago when I read about the positive effects of dog ownership. I began thinking that if owning a dog could lower a person’s stress level, and if just petting the dog could release pleasurable hormones, then maybe a dog could help calm highly anxious students with autism in a school setting.

Read More »

The Asperger Diagnosis Challenge

Being diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome in 1997 was one of the best things that ever happened to my son, Drew. Make no mistake, Asperger Syndrome can be duplicitous. It can give you abilities that make people shake their heads in wonder, and deficits that just make them shake their heads. In elementary school, Drew wowed his teacher and classmates with an encyclopedic knowledge of Greek mythology, but then annoyed them with a compulsion to talk incessantly about Perseus and friends.

Read More »

The Beales of Grey Gardens

Last week I watched a fascinating film about Big and Little Edie Bouvier Beale, aunt and cousin to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. They were brought to public attention back in the early 1970’s because of the uninhabitable state of their home, Grey Gardens, in East Hampton, New York.

Read More »

Speaking in Pattern, Theme and Feel

Speaking in sounds, movements, through the feel and theme of songs, jingles and advertisments was my first language. Affirmation was a structure that made sense, to use a jingle to affirm a feeling. So someone says, ‘we’re going’ out and I say ‘Gilligan’s Island’ to me this is an affirmation, just they are speaking interpretively and I’m speaking in theme and feel. Statements made sense because I was all self/no other, and all other/no self.

Read More »

Ventriloquism by a Boy With Asperger Syndrome

As part of a qualitative methodology course at the University of Ottawa in the Faculty of Education, graduate students were invited to conduct a “pilot research study” employing one of the five traditions of inquiry identified by Creswell (1998). Struck by the phenomenological approach, I chose an “incident” of interest to me – the case of a boy with Asperger’s syndrome who had used a ventriloquist’s puppet to communicate in an unusual way with his family, friends and ultimately – himself.

Read More »