Autism News Tagged "sleep disorders and autism"

Sleep Baby Sleep: Bedtime Tips for Those with Autism

Parents at one time or another struggle with a child who has difficulty falling asleep turning bedtime into a stressful time of the day. Instead of being a comforting time to wind down, tempers flare and tears fall. Children with autism seem to be particularly prone to poor sleeping habits that surface when trying to go to bed, in the middle of the night, or in chronic early waking.

I have several friends with autistic children who struggle getting their child to sleep. “It’s awful,” complains Andrea.

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Bone Tired: Autism and Parental Fatigue

One of my most popular Facebook posts this month was about University of Regina’s Sarah Elizabeth Ivens’ thesis about parental fatigue entitled Fatigue in parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The role of parental and child factors for mothers and fathers. While most parents of newborn children have experienced some level of fatigue, many of us who have children…

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Causes of Sleep Disturbances for Those with ASD

A good night’s sleep is important. Without it, children can be irritable, struggle with academics, engage in more repetitive behaviours, become easily fatigued, and are more likely to suffer from unintentional injury. Over the long term, poor sleep can lead to adult obesity, anxiety in adulthood, and sleep problems throughout adulthood.

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What in the World Is Going On – November 2013 Edition

This will come of no surprise to most parents, but a recent study in the Archives of Disease in Childhood on sleep revealed that children with autism have poorer sleep quality than do other children. They both sleep less overall and are prone to frequent night wakening. “Clear differences in sleep patterns began to emerge around 30 months of age…

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What in the World Is Going On, September 2012 Edition

The start of a new school year is on most people’s minds these days. Everyone wants to start the year off right. Teachers may find the School Community Toolkit a helpful resource to learn more about autism, inclusion, educating classmates, the rights of students with autism, instructional methods in teaching students, assistive technologies, therapies used, and ideas for a team approach. There is also an All About Me form for parents and caregivers to use about introducing their child to school staff. Another great All About Me form to be used for school or community activities can be found here.

There was a great UK blog post this past month from Carole Rutherford on classroom sensory scripts. This covers physical aspects of the classroom, a new teacher, unfamiliar fixtures and fittings in the new classroom, and much more. “Going into a new classroom with a new teacher can be difficult for every child. But when you add all of the sensory scripting that a child with autism has to add to the things they are expected to learn each day, it is not surprising that many of our children suffer from anxiety and stress on a daily basis, day in and day out.”

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