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Everything from how to deal with wrap around services for your child with autism, to how exercise and yoga benefits those with ASD. This section contains all the blog posts and articles pertaining to medical health, treatments and services for those with autism.

Genetic risks found in half of autistic children, new study shows

One of the most common questions about autism is what causes it. There has been a considerable amount of research done in the field of genetics, hoping to find the cause. A new study has identified genetic risk in 50 per cent of autism cases. To read more about this new groundbreaking research, click here.

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Researchers Call for Open Access to Autism Diagnostic Tools

Epidemiological studies of autism prevalence does not happen often in low to middle income countries; nor is much known about how autism symptoms vary from culture to culture. A major barrier to diagnosis in countries outside of North America and Europe is the cost of assessments. “There are glaring disparities globally, and even within the U.S., in terms of where…

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Pollution Now a Possible Factor in the Cause of Autism

There have been numerous theories on what causes autism. The latest US research is now saying women who live near busy roads are twice as likely to have a child with autism. Lead scientist of this research Dr Andrea Roberts, of the Harvard School of Public Health, said: “Our findings raise concerns since, depending on the pollutant, 20% to 60% of the women in our study lived in areas where risk of autism was elevated.”

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In Autism, the Importance of the Gut

The connection between autism and gut issues have been known about for over a decade, yet we still have much to learn about this connection. Challenging behavior can be a result of severe gut issues, as was the case with Michael – a boy with autism from New York City. It wasn’t until the family met Dr. Kara Margolis. Margolis, 36, pediatric gastroenterologist at New York Presbyterian Hospital and a researcher at Columbia University Medical Center, that any cause for Michael’s self-injurious behaviors surfaced. Psychiatrists have always received the referrals for challenging behavior.

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The Death of A Myth: Dr. Wakefield and the MMR-Autism Link

On Thursday, January 6th, the Globe and Mail ran an article about one of the great research frauds in recent history – Dr. Andrew Wakefield’s study that developed a probable link between the MMR vaccine as a cause of autism. Dr. Wakefield first published his findings in The Lancet on Feb. 28, 1998. He wanted the MMR vaccine replaced by three separate shots, then strangely enough he patented his own measles vaccine to replace the MMR one.

In 2004 a British journalist from The Sunday Times, Brian Deer, published evidence of Dr. Wakfield’s ties to the MMR lawsuit launched by a group against the vaccine. He was on their payroll and his research was going to be the centerpiece of the group’s claim. The children in the lawsuit were recruited unethically and there were other flaws in Wakefield’s study. For years, scientists have been trying to reproduce his findings but none have ever found a link between autism and the MMR vaccine.

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The DSM-V Quandary

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV), published by the American Psychiatric Association, is used by medical professionals world wide to diagnose mental disorders. The revised manual, the DSM V, is due out in 2012.

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Taking Time For Yourself

Setting aside time just for yourself is not something any mother does readily. We know we’re supposed to look after ourselves but that usually comes after childcare, a job outside of the home, housecleaning, grocery shopping, meal preparation and running errands.

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The Next Attention Deficit Disorder?

With a teacher for a mom and a physician’s assistant for a dad, Matthew North had two experts on the case from birth, but his problems baffled them both. “Everything was hard for Matthew,” says Theresa North, of Highland Ranch, Colo. He didn’t speak until he was 3. In school, he’d hide under a desk to escape noise and activity. He couldn’t coordinate his limbs well enough to catch a big beach ball.

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How Sensory Integration and Nutrition Interact

Sensory Integration (SI) is a complex process that makes it possible for a person to take in, organize and interpret information from our bodies and the world. Collating sensory information efficiently enables humans to function smoothly in daily life. For example: Is the soup hot or cold? Are my arms or legs going to bump into anything? Do I need to go to the bathroom?

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